I spoke to my client last night, and #Gutenberg interview is happening. He’s really excited about it and we’ll record next week.
Longer than 280 chars so you’ll need to click, but I’m speaking with my #Gutenberg-using blind client this evening, and I’m going to ask if I can interview him. There’s been a ton of real accessibility progress on it and as someone who’s levelled some of the harshest criticism against it I’d also like to help move things forward by giving credit where it’s due and helping other people migrate now that it’s possible.
I’m writing these shorter posts as well because one of my professional goals for this year is to start writing more tutorials and case studies, and I need to exercise my writing muscles, and the best way for me to do that is, well, just write, even if it’s short content for the time being.
I’m in the process of importing a ton of old bookmarks from Pocket into customerservant.com. The bookmarks section as well as the reads section has proven to be not only a really easy way for me to find things again, but also a great place to store resources others can use and to which I can tie related resources. It turns out that these are the most frequently updated portions of the site, so I need to do more to highlight them.
Bookmarked a post by an author

Author Mark Wilkinson Date 9th September 2018 Topics DevelopmentIntroduction
I have been using WordPress for many years – all the way back to version 2.0 in 2005 and I am now co-owner of a WordPress agency, here at Highrise Digital. A key breakthrough for me, in terms of being a WordPress develope…

Hooks, actions and filters are basically the bread and butter of WordPress development.
Bookmarked Adding Custom Information to a WordPress Category Edit Page by Tom

Adding additional meta boxes, fields, and other information to WordPress is easy if you know the right hooks and the proper APIs to follow. But what if you want to add information to a WordPress taxonomy page?
For example, say you want to create a custom WordPress category edit page or, at the very …

This from Tom McFarlin. has been extremely useful in client work.
Sometimes the best work you can do on a website is to remove things. In my case, it’s removing several plugins that are ultimately getting in my way.

If you’ve been running your site for a while, and you’re feeling hemmed in, consider taking a really good look at the plugins you have installed and active. If one or more of them are getting in your way, consider whether or not you need the functionality for your site, and, if you decide you don’t, remove the plugin and any related code snippets.

I have somehow managed to nuke my desktop Twitter client for work so that it won’t authorize. Seems like the perfect time to just switch to the official client, and mostly work on smoothing out the writing workflow for this site.
I’ll write more on this later, but for now I’m extremely pleased to report that I’ve trained my first blind client on #Gutenberg, and thanks to the hard work of everyone who’s worked to make it more accessible, they thoroughly enjoyed using it.
Cold emailing me to ask if I’ll link to your totally unrelated site because you’re a blind blogger is bad enough. Starting it all off with "Hello beautiful" when we don’t know each other at all is going to get you an instant nope.