Bookmarked Under-Engineered Text Boxen by Adrian Roselli (Adrian Roselli)

This is the latest, and not last, in my informal series of posts on under-engineered controls. Generally I am looking at the minimum amount of CSS necessary to style native HTML controls while also retaining or improving accessibility and honoring different user preferences.

Glad to see I’m not the only one who uses “boxen” as plural for “boses”.
Bookmarked Link + Disclosure Widget Navigation by Adrian Roselli (Adrian Roselli)

Early in 2017 I filed an issue against WAI-ARIA Authoring Practices (APG) requesting a change to the menu navigation pattern. Despite a great deal of feedback in agreement, it languished.

I’m looking forward to taking this pattern as well as the linked ones for a spin. I’m hoping for an opportunity to find at least one of these in use in the wild, preferably coupled with research with other people with disabilities. Barring that, it’ll be fascinating to find out which one I like better.
Bookmarked The Mailto Link Generator by Michael Mckeever (Mailto Link Generator)

Mailto link code and markup generator with subject, body, cc and bcc. Quickly and easily generate code for those annoying mailto links.

Clickable email addresses which allow your site’s visitors to send you email, (otherwise known as mailto links), can be quite handy, and they’re easy to generate if you type HTML as if it’s your first spoken language. If you don’t do that, they can seem like the hardest thing to create, and you have a couple of options for creating them: Google what you need and then save that information in a place you’ll hopefully remember, or just use this mailto link generator. Simply fill out the form appropriately, generate the HTML you need, and copy and paste. Note that if you’re doing this using a WordPress installation, you’ll want to switch your editor to the code view if you’re using the Classic Editor, or use the custom HTML block if you’re using the editor as of WordPress 5.0. You can also insert your generated mailto links in the custom HTML widget for use in any widgetized area your theme provides. See this post for a complete guide to WordPress widgets, which includes a section on the custom HTML widget.
Bookmarked Static Indieweb pt2: Using Webmentions by Max Böck (Max Böck – Frontend Web Developer)

How to pull interactions from social media platforms like Twitter back to your own site, using Webmentions, webmention.io and Bridgy.

Syndicating your content to social networks is all well and good, but the real fun happens when you can bring back the reactions from those social networks to your own site and display them all regardless of which site or network they come from. If your site is static, you’ll need to employ a couple of third-party services to accomplish this, whereas with WordPress or Drupal you’ll need to install some plugins. Even if you’re not a developer, the fact that you can pull in reactions to your content from all over the web is a beautiful thing to behold. And I’m looking forward to the time when most domains on the web support both syndication out and bringing reactions back in. Neither of these takes much effort, and they’re taking less and less. There’s not a lot of cost to implementing these things either anymore, and if we can get to a point where everyone who’s now using social media as their primary platform has their own domain and their own website and is able to syndicate out and bring reactions back in, then all the data currently being sucked up by the large social media platforms no longer is as plentiful, and therefore loses its value. This will, however, take work on the part of all of us, whether that’s building solutions for otheres to use or helping others use those solutions.
Bookmarked Static Indieweb pt1: Syndicating Content by Max Böck (Max Böck – Frontend Web Developer)

How to automatically publish content from a static site on Twitter, using Eleventy and Netlify’s lambda functions.

This tutorial on implementing syndication on static sites should be useful for those who don’t want to use something like WordPress or another database-driven content management system to power their site. As much as some of us would like silos like Twitter or Facebook to disappear, for most people they’re currently necessary, (the network effect), and so syndication is something that has to be part of the mix. And the more you can automate, the better.